Thursday, June 14, 2012

Sepia Saturday 130

I do not contribute every week to Sepia Saturday but I couldn't let this week go by.  Not when the prompt picture involves a cat.  So off I went to American Memory at the USA Library of Congress and found the image below, from the Chicago Daily News.


Dr. Edith Finley Norton sitting next to a small table on which a cat named Buster Bright sits. The images of other women are reflected in a mirror or panel of glass behind Dr. Norton.

  (Source: http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/ndlpcoop/ichihtml/cdnhome.html  search for cat)

The google machine is less than helpful about Dr. Norton.  What is her doctorate in?  Why was her photograph taken for the paper?  The date isn't even known - it's catalogued under 1900 - 1909.  And you can imagine that even less is known about Buster Bright, other than he (I assume a he) has very long fur.  At least the cat's name is known.  It's sad that so much is lost in the past.

I am on vacation and so will not be able to visit too many participants in Sepia Saturday.  You however, certainly can!

Viridian

10 comments:

barbara and nancy said...

Perhaps she's a dr. of veterinarian medicine. That would make sense.
Lovely hat.
Nancy

Little Nell said...

Thank you for joining us again this week with this enchanting picture. So much left to the imagination. Enjoy your vacation!

Bob Scotney said...

Nice cat; but not on a table.

Wendy said...

Buster Bright -- what a wonderful cat name!

Colleen G. Brown Pasquale said...

For some reason, I never think to take our cats out to dinner.

Postcardy said...

Buster Bright looks like a very distinguished cat.

Oregon Gifts of Comfort and Joy said...

What a great picture! Thank you for the link to The Library of Congress also.

Hope that you are enjoying your vacation!

Kathy M.

Dee said...

What a neat old photo...

Dee at Shakin' the Family Tree

Bees Knees Daily said...

Did a check on the wording on the sign behind Dr. Norton. It appears to be Chloro-Naptholeum and on the next line is the word disinfecting. When I googled the term, it appears in an ebook entitled "Wool Markets and sheep, Volume 7" http://tinyurl.com/7ceqyqo. An ad on page 12 states it was used to cure mange, lice, itch and ticks. So, it's safe to assume Dr. Norton was a Vet and this was an animal hospital. Guess the cat was a patient.

Tattered and Lost said...

I'm guessing her sleeves were pretty much covered with cat hair.

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