Thursday, February 25, 2010

PFF: greetings from China




I received a lovely postcard from the city of Shenyang the other day, as part of Postcrossing. It is from Xiuzeng, who wishes me Happy Spring.
It is a geological card, sure to make me happy! A spectacular landscape caused by extreme erosion. Towers of sedimentary material standing tall as the weaker rock has been eroded away. It reminds me a bit of Bryce Canyon, but with somewhat stronger rocks, and more vegetation.

Also note the lovely stamps. A regal lion, a landscape much like the one shown in the postcard, and a wonderful blossoming branch - perhaps almond or cherry blossoms.

I really think the USA has boring stamps - with some exceptions. There are varieties of stamps for first class domestic postage (now 44 cents as I write), but do you want a stamp for overseas airmail? There is only ONE issued stamp for 98 cents. No wonder many European postcrossers ask the Americans to look for different stamps.

I try: 2 44 cent stamps and and a 10 cent stamp. I've gone through the Simpsons, Gary Cooper, the Kelp Forest, classic TV shows, Chinese New Year, famous sailors. Now my post office has very little. I am using the Celebrate! and wedding rings stamps. Better than the forever stamp I suppose.

I hope Marie starts her meme this Friday!
viridian

12 comments:

Stacey said...

The Chinese stamps are really beautiful... I've never thought about U.S. international stamps but I guess that's true. I wonder why? Anyways, thanks for visiting last week and happy week late pff!

Snap said...

Wonderful card (China's landscape has always fascinated me) and the stamps are gorgeous. Too true about our international airmail stamps. Happy PFF!

Postcardy said...

It is possible to buy old stamps. I have used leftover stamps like four 25¢.

Linda said...

Stunning landscape, and good point. Yep, the old stamps are pretty fascinating can be used in combination. Loved seeing the tribute to old jazz musicians recently, an old series (about 10 years?) that someone posted to me.

KYMBERLY said...

I also posted an Oriental Postcard! The landscape on yours is gorgeous! I appreciate the fact that you took the time to tell us about the history behind your cards! Very informative!

Thank you, Kymberly

Chris Overstreet said...

I frequently see old stamps being sold at face value on eBay; I look for the 32- and 33-cent stamps to make up the 98-cent postage.

Aimee said...

Beautiful card and I love the stamps too!

Sheila said...

I love that card, and the trees perched on top are quite incredible! the stamps are wonderful too. I don't collect stamps but I'm always pleased to see nice stamps on my cards, so I try to send something I'd like. I buy whatever commemoratives there are when they appear, and make them up to international postage with whatever there is to hand. Sometimes it taxes my mental arithmetic!

steviewren said...

Like you I always use a combination of regular stamps that adds up to the .98 postage for an international postcard. I want to receive interesting stamps so I try to send them in turn. Chris has a great idea for finding other stamps to use.

Mary said...

I absolutely loved the kelp forest stamps, and wish I had more. Maybe it's because I got certified for scuba diving in a kelp forest in Monterey Bay!

Lyneen said...

WOW... what AWESOME landscape... beautiful stamps. Thanks for stopping by... PPF!

Irene said...

I love your posts, when my boys were young and we talk about rock formations, (I thought maybe my eldest would do something in that line as a career) anyway, we often went looking for sedimentary rocks. How silly. I think we only think our stamps are boring because we see them all the time. I collected Christmas stamps for a number of years and now after not looking at them so often find them more than O.K. Happy PFF a little late.

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